(Augustine, City of God, 16.8.662)

SUB SPECIE AETERNITATIS: See discussion under .

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Saint Isidore of Seville includes discussion of them in his Etymologies, claiming they live in Ethiopia, where they travel with remarkable speed by hopping rapidly. Primarily through Isidore and Augustine's transmissions, Skiapodes became popular iconography in and world maps, such as the Hereford Mappa Mundi (c. 1300) and the Beatus Liebanae (8th century), eventually even finding themselves into Viking sagas such as Erik the Red. C.S. Lewis includes them as one of the fantastic encounters in Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

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SERIALIZATION: Publication of a longer work piecemeal over a series of weeks or months (or years), often in periodicals like newspapers or magazines. Publishers might find specific works suitable for serial publication for a number of economic or practical reasons, ranging from maximizing sales profits (by charging more per unit than they could feasibly charge for the collective work--spreading out the purchase cost for the reader over time), minimizing risk (so publishers can terminate the literary project with only one or two short publications rather than the expense of publishing one massive tome if it proves unpopular), or simply allowing the author of unfinished works a chance to test the waters before completing the work. Examples of serialized works include Lewis' The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and Stephen King's The Green Mile.

SETSUWA TALE: A Japanese tale dating to the10th-14th centuries, typically sharing a grotesque mode of representation, especially a tendency to depict the body and bodily functions in bizarre or fantastic ways.

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Many later poets and critics disdained Skeltonic verse. James VI, for instance, declared it fit only for satirical poems, and the Romantic poets considered it ungraceful.

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SIRVENTE: A satirical Provençal poem that focuses on the flaws of individuals or on public concerns such as the folly of a war, or the abuses of the Church.

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SKIAPOD (Greek, "shadow-foot"; plural skiapodes): Also called monopods, these one-legged humanoids appears in ancient Greco-Roman writings such as Pliny's Natural History, Aristophanes The Birds, Ctesias's India, and Philostratus' Life of Apollonius of Tynna. In medieval writings, Saint Augustine writes:

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Geographically, the speakers of the various slavic languages primarily reside in eastern Europe, much of the Balkans, parts of Central Eruope, and the northern regions of Asia, and linguists categorize the slavic languages into three smaller "leaf" branches: Eastern Slavic (Old East Slavic, Old Novgorod, Ruthenian, Belarusian, Russian, Ukrainian, and Rusyn); West Slavic (Czech, Slovak, Lechitic, Old Polish, Middle Polish, Polish, Pomeranian, Kashubian, Slovincian, Polabian, Sorbian, Knaanic), and South Slavic (Old Church Slavonic, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Church Slavonic, Serbo-Croatian, and Slovenian).

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SLEEPING HERO MOTIF: A motif common in Celtic folklore and Arthurian literature in which the heroes or mythological beings of old are not dead, but rather sleeping, waiting in heaven, or stored in alternative worlds like Fairyland. At some future time, they will awake or be called forth to fulfill some important function. In the legends of King Arthur, for instance, Malory recounts him as "Rex quandam et rex futurus," the once and future king who will return to Britain in the hour of its greatest need. We see 20th-century versions of this recreated in C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia. For instance, in Prince Caspian, Caspian's forces re-summon High King Peter and the other Pevensie children to save them from the Telmarine usurpers. More apocalyptically, in The Last Battle, we read of how a giant named Time sleeps in a cavern under the earth, waiting for Aslan to wake him so he can blow his horn to summon the stars from the sky before he plucks the sun of Narnia and destroys the world. Anthropologists might argue that, in the Christian tradition, the idea that Christ will have a second coming and return to earth is another example of the motif.