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However, my experience of New York is different completely different from theirs....

Original cover (only) from this issue of The New Yorker.

The new service will bring the educational consortium into a growing conflict over the role of automation in education. Although automated grading systems for multiple-choice and true-false tests are now widespread, the use of artificial intelligence technology to grade essay answers has not yet received widespread endorsement by educators and has many critics.

Original cover (only) from this issue of The New Yorker.

Original cover (only) from this issue of The New Yorker.

Though he and his wife pop up in Hollywood in 1932, the 1940 census finds them listed as residents of New York as of April 1, 1935. Regardless, it’s clear that by 1940 Azzimonti resettled to Los Angeles where his wife would pass away three years later. He died three years later in Rotterdam, New York, having seemingly returned eastward.

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These are the satirical and humorous observations that round off the columns in almost every issue of The New Yorker. Although uncredited, they bore the White imprint for many years. Their headings became part of the language: ''Neatest Trick of the Week''; ''Go Climb a Tree Department''; ''Letters We Never Finished Reading''; ''Our Forgetful Authors''; ''Funny Coincidence Department''; ''Wind on Capitol Hill.''

Original cover (only) from this issue of The New Yorker.


Original cover (only) from this issue of The New Yorker.

The New York Daily News previewed its Thursday front page with commentary on special counsel Robert Mueller, that the Russia investigation is focusing more closely on former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

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Mr. White's score of books - essays, poems, sketches, letters - include ''The Points of My Compass,'' ''The Second Tree From the Corner,'' ''Here Is New York,'' ''One Man's Meat'' and (with James Thurber) ''Is Sex Necessary?''

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Mr. White was born in Mount Vernon, N.Y., on July 11, 1899. His parents had moved there from Brooklyn, he later surmised, ''because Mount Vernon sounded tonier.'' After serving as editor in chief of The Cornell Sun, he worked for the United Press in New York for a year, became a reporter for The Seattle Times for two years, tried his hand in an advertising agency as a production assistant and copywriter, and then found his niche as a contributor to The New Yorker in 1927.

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As a CUNY graduate fellow at the New-York Historical Society, I’ve been helping to process the . Lieutenant General James Guthrie Harbord (1866-1947) retired in 1922 from a distinguished military career to serve as Chairman of the Board of RCA for nearly 25 years. Mixed in with many files of routine business correspondence, I’ve come across some interesting ephemera with Western imagery, including a large collection of hotel advertisements.

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In this blog post, I’d like to share some of this ephemera and consider how the West was imagined in the early twentieth century as a place of recovery and rest, both from diseases like tuberculosis, as well as from the stress of living in a rapidly urbanizing society. However, Harbor’s symbolic induction as a member of the Crow Nation also proposes the West as a place to take on a new identity, either Native American, or “Cowboy/girl,” and to dwell (at least temporarily) in the historic past. The materials pictured in this post suggest that the idea of the West is as important to American history as the actual material assets of the region.

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''Watched over and inspirited by The New Yorker's founding editor, Harold Ross, he and James Thurber were the writers who did most to determine the magazine's shape, tone and direction. Even though White lived much of his life on a farm in Maine, remote from the clatter of publicity and celebrity, fame overtook him, fortunately leaving him untouched. His connections with nature were intimate and ardent. He loved his farm, his farm animals, his neighbors, his family and words.''