Romeo and juliet youth and age essay | nabarcom

Romeo and Juliet had a strong love for each which no one could separate even if they were apart.

Essays on Youth Vs Old Age Romeo And Juliet – Essay Depot

Baz Luhrman’s and William Shakespeare’s versions of Romeo and Juliet are similar in theme, but are different in setting, mood, and character personalities.

Romeo and Juliet takes place in the 1500s in the city of Verona.

Shakespeare wrote Romeo and Juliet in the late fifteen hundreds in the riveting city of Verona, Italy, where it has since been revered as one of the most preeminent and recognized play’s in history....

This is one of Romeo and Juliet's most elegant soliloquies. Juliet testifies to the power of separation from her beloved and reminds the audience of the play's recurring theme of order vs. disorder. As Shakespeare establishes earlier in the play, Juliet associates order with the calm of night and disorder with the complications of daytime. The dramatic irony of her speech is that by this point, the audience knows that Romeo has killed Tybalt and will soon be punished, while Juliet does not - which only underscores the intensity of the divide between order and disorder. Furthermore, Juliet's language has sexual overtones because she is anticipating the consummation of her marriage. She thinks of nighttime as the time when she and her lover can find peace away from the chaos surrounding them. She also betrays her age and youthful idealism in her childish hope that the power of their love can change the world. Her optimism is all the more affecting because the Nurse arrives moments later and tells Juliet the bad news of Romeo's banishment.


Romeo and Juliet is set in Verona, Italy.

The play is a very tragic at the end when Romeo and Juliet die due with their parent’s strife and hatred; however their death ends the anger and rage between the two families.

Romeo and Juliet is a great example of a Shakespearean tragedy....

When Romeo reconnects with Benvolio and Mercutio after meeting Juliet in her courtyard, Mercutio speaks these lines to him out of admiration. As Mercutio notes, Romeo has traded his tendency for pensive moping and can now verbally jest with ease. In calling Romeo "sociable," Mercutio is potentially suggesting that after meeting Juliet, Romeo has reclaimed his masculinity - he is now the man he is meant to be "by art as well as nature." However, these lines also indicate that Romeo has discovered his true identity now that he has sworn his love to Juliet. He loves no less than he had before (he actually loves more), but he now knows that he need not broadcast those feelings to the world. He no longer has use for generating attention in that way, because he has found a new outlet for his passion. Therefore, when Mercutio commends his friend's new attitude, he is noting that Romeo has indeed matured. By extension, Shakespeare suggests that love helps a person achieve autonomy, and therefore, navigate the world with confidence.

This is the theme of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

One of the importances of the first scene of the play is to introduce the audience to the majority of the lead charecters such as Romeo and Juliet, Benvolio and Tybalt, Sampson and Gregory, Lord and Lady Capulet, Lord and Lady Montague and Prince....

The death of Romeo and Juliet was partially because of free will.

In the concluding speech of Romeo and Juliet, the Prince wraps up the tragic plot and suggests the possibility of future peace between the Montagues and Capulets. He does describe it as a "glooming peace", which does not detract from the fact that the play has reached a reconciliation, but it is also indicative of some more subtle points. First of all, Romeo and Juliet is not truly a classical tragedy because it ends with a reconciliation instead of total annihilation. Some scholars do not ascribe to this interpretation but regardless, it is clear that the play has moral overtones, since the youthful purity of Romeo and Juliet's love leads to positive changes in their world, even though they are no longer alive. When the Prince notes that the "sun…will not show his head," it reminds the audience about the connection between daytime and disorder. The lesson here seems to be then, that tragedy can lead to change, if people are actually willing to learn from it.