Free curfew Essays and Papers - 123HelpMe

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"See note on Eton Ode .
To these two lines it has been objected that they are obscurely expressed, and seem to combine a blessing and a curse as if they were cognate ideas. But Gray defines his melancholy to West, May 27, 1742 'Mine, you are to know, is a white Melancholy, or rather Leucocholy for the most part, which though it seldom laughs or dances, nor ever amounts to what one calls Joy or Pleasure, yet is a good easy sort of state' &c. His melancholy was closely connected with his studious retirement, and its nature is exactly fixed in these two lines. Milton's Il Penseroso is Gray all over, and it is noteworthy that whereas Milton is certainly indebted to the verses prefixed to Burton's Anatomy of Melanchol for his two companion poems, Burton has given to his melancholy man some of the pleasures which Milton has transferred to L'Allegro. Gray might say with La Fontaine:

J'aime ... les livres, la musique
La ville et la campagne, enfin tout; il n'est rien,
Qui ne me soit souverain bien,
Jusqu'aux sombres plaisirs d'un coeur melancolique."

Chicago Curfew: City Council Approves Stricter ..

Free Teen Violence Essays and Papers - 123HelpMe

" ''Jam jam non domus accipiet te laeta, neque uxor
optima, nec dulces occurrent oscula nati
praeripere et tacita pectus dulcedine tangent.''
Lucretius, III. 894-896.
''Now no more shall thy house admit thee with glad welcome, nor a most virtuous wife and sweet children run to be the first to snatch kisses and touch thy heart with a silent joy.'' (Munro.)
Though Lucretius is only mentioning these common regrets of mankind in order to show their unreasonableness, there is no doubt that Gray had this passage well in his mind here. Feeling this, Munro renders it in quite Lucretian phraseology: e.g.
''Jam jam non erit his rutilans focus igne:
and
non reditum balbe current patris hiscere nati.''
But Gray adds also an Horatian touch, as Mitford points out:
''Quodsi pudica mulier in partem juvet
domum atque dulces liberos
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
sacrum vetustis excitet lignis focum
lassi sub adventum viri,'' &c. Hor. Epode, II. 39 sq.
[''But if a chaste and pleasing wife
To ease the business of his life
Divides with him his household care
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Will fire for winter nights provide,
And without noise will oversee
His children and his family
And order all things till he come
Weary and over-laboured home'' &c. Dryden.]
Thomson in his Winter, 1726, had written of the shepherd overwhelmed in the snow-storm:
''In vain for him the officious wife prepares
The fire fair-blazing, and the vestment warm;
In vain his little children, peeping out
Into the mingling rack, demand their sire
With tears of artless innocence.'' (ll. 311-315.)"

Free Teen Violence papers, essays, and research papers.

" ''Jam jam non domus accipiet te laeta, neque uxor
optima, nec dulces occurrent oscula nati
praeripere et tacita pectus dulcedine tangent.''
Lucretius, III. 894-896.
''Now no more shall thy house admit thee with glad welcome, nor a most virtuous wife and sweet children run to be the first to snatch kisses and touch thy heart with a silent joy.'' (Munro.)
Though Lucretius is only mentioning these common regrets of mankind in order to show their unreasonableness, there is no doubt that Gray had this passage well in his mind here. Feeling this, Munro renders it in quite Lucretian phraseology: e.g.
''Jam jam non erit his rutilans focus igne:
and
non reditum balbe current patris hiscere nati.''
But Gray adds also an Horatian touch, as Mitford points out:
''Quodsi pudica mulier in partem juvet
domum atque dulces liberos
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
sacrum vetustis excitet lignis focum
lassi sub adventum viri,'' &c. Hor. Epode, II. 39 sq.
[''But if a chaste and pleasing wife
To ease the business of his life
Divides with him his household care
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Will fire for winter nights provide,
And without noise will oversee
His children and his family
And order all things till he come
Weary and over-laboured home'' &c. Dryden.]
Thomson in his Winter, 1726, had written of the shepherd overwhelmed in the snow-storm:
''In vain for him the officious wife prepares
The fire fair-blazing, and the vestment warm;
In vain his little children, peeping out
Into the mingling rack, demand their sire
With tears of artless innocence.'' (ll. 311-315.)"

GOP Lawmaker Defends Incarceration Of Japanese …