Some essays published earlier as pamphlets

To evaluate the effectiveness of a cause and effect essay, ask the following questions:

Frederick Engels, Ernest Untermann, eds.

The fundamental challenges of the teaching profession are also well-articulated in Connecticut's , which includes "six domains and 46 indicators that identify the foundational skills and competencies that pertain to all teachers, regardless of the subject matter, field or age group they teach" (p. 2). They are useful for teacher preparation programs, beginning teachers, and experienced teachers. For example, among professional responsibilities, the Connecticut Department of Education (2010) indicated "Continually engaging in reflection, self-evaluation and professional development to enhance their understandings of content, pedagogical skills, resources and the impact of their actions on student learning" (p. 10). Collaboration and proactive communication with colleagues, administrators, students, and families are featured elements, as are understanding the legal rights of individuals with disabilities, and the role that race, gender, and culture might have on professional interactions with students, families, and colleagues, and ethical uses of technology.

Choosing the essay topic for cause and effect essay type is not difficult, here are some :

Samuel Moore, Edward Aveling, trans.

is an Amazon initiative supported by several leading organizations (e.g., NCTM, ASCD, PERTS, Common Sense Education, the Teaching Channel, Edutopia, and more). The goal is to change students' attitudes about math. You'll find several resources on mindset for the classroom, district, and the home.

Now that you know a little more about Sudoku, play and enjoy this free online game.

Silver, H., Strong, R., & Perini, M. (2007). The strategic teacher: Selecting the right research-based strategy for every lesson. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Retrieved from

Batson, trans.Foreword by Murray Rothbard and Introduction by Lionel Robbins not available online.


Part 1: Math Methodology: Instruction

Students should work at all levels of the taxonomy. It should not be viewed as a ladder, however, nor as a framework for differentiated instruction (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006, pp. 119-120). The taxonomy is helpful for breaking down state standards into meaningful components as teachers plan their instruction. Planning for instruction will be elaborated upon in of this essay on content and curriculum mapping.

Positive attitudes and perceptions about learning

There is more than one kind of learning. In 1956 Benjamin Bloom identified three domains of learning: cognitive, affective, and psychomotor. The cognitive domain focus on knowledge or mental skills; the affective on the growth of feelings, emotions, attitudes; and the psychomotor on manual or physical skills (Clark, 2013). Within , the cognitive domain contains six levels: knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. The taxonomy was later revised in the mid-90's and now has levels of remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating (Clark, 2013; Forehand, 2005). You can learn more on the at the Educational Origami web site.

Acquiring and integrating knowledge

Charles White (2007) provided a closer look at how Bloom’s Taxonomy provides levels of understanding to guide teaching and assessing knowledge. Teaching for each level has different instructional strategies and testing techniques.

Extending and refining knowledge

Visit . Peeragogy is a collection of techniques for collaborative learning and collaborative work. This handbook is a "living-document" created by a world-wide community of editors interested in peer-to-peer learning. The ideas can be applied in classrooms, in research, in business, and more.

Level: Intermediate, Upper intermediate Type: Teaching notes

Robert Slavin (2014), director of the Center for Research and Reform in Education, discussed five strategies to make cooperative learning powerful. He stated, "It is the "learning" in cooperative learning that is too often left out. But it needn't be. Using these five strategies, teachers can get the greatest benefit possible from cooperative learning and ensure that collaboration enhances learning" (para. 3):